Murder most East Anglian

16 12 2017

 

It is 1937 and disillusioned Spanish Civil War veteran Stephen Sefton is stony broke. So when he sees a mysterious advertisement for a job where ‘intelligence is essential’, he applies.

Thus begins Sefton’s association with Professor Swanton Morley, an omnivorous intellect. Morley’s latest project is a history of traditional England, with a guide to every county.

They start in Norfolk, but when the vicar of Blakeney is found hanging from his church’s bellrope, Morley and Sefton find themselves drawn into a rather more fiendish plot. Did the Reverend really take his own life, or was it – murder?

Beginning a thrilling new detective series, ‘The Norfolk Mystery’ is the first of The County Guides. A must-read for fans of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Agatha Christie, every county is a crime scene, and with 39 counties in store there’ll be plenty of murder, mystery and mayhem to confound and entertain you for years to come.

It’s very much pitched as Miss Marple meets Sherlock Holmes and certainly embraces elements of both with a largely entertaining mix of highbrow banter and murder. Irritating in some parts, fun in others it was certainly distinctive. Not sure I’m ready for part 2 in the series, let alone another 38.

 

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One response

24 12 2017
Paul

I had forgotten about this in the book: “And then we’ve got all of Norwich to do. Carrow Road. “Come on, the Canaries!” Though I’m not a great fan of association football.”

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