The end of the world as we know it

8 09 2018

Station Eleven by Emily St John Mandel

 

What was lost in the collapse: almost everything, almost everyone, but there is still such beauty.

One snowy night in Toronto famous actor Arthur Leander dies on stage whilst performing the role of a lifetime. That same evening a deadly virus touches down in North America. The world will never be the same again.

Twenty years later Kirsten, an actress in the Travelling Symphony, performs Shakespeare in the settlements that have grown up since the collapse. But then her newly hopeful world is threatened.

If civilization was lost, what would you preserve? And how far would you go to protect it?

An outstanding novel covering the beginning of the end as a deadly virus rapidly brings the world to its knees and then the years afterwards as the few remaining try to survive and rebuild society in whatever way they can. Some great characters, switching of the narrative between the crisis and two decades later and a throughly convincing backdrop means that Mandel offers a quite compelling dystopia which feels complementary to the post-virus British survival trilogy conjured up by Louise Welsh.

Recommended (with thanks to @BlatherwickIain who recommended it to me).

four stars

Advertisements

Actions

Information

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.




%d bloggers like this: