Prole Art Threat 2015 in review

31 12 2015

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2015 annual report for this blog.

 

It’s really not very impressive to be honest so perhaps best avoided

Here’s an excerpt:

A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 2,900 times in 2015. If it were a cable car, it would take about 48 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

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Clocking on

19 07 2015

The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell

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One drowsy summer’s day in 1984, teenage runaway Holly Sykes encounters a strange woman who offers a small kindness in exchange for ‘asylum’. Decades will pass before Holly understands exactly what sort of asylum the woman was seeking . . .
The Bone Clocks follows the twists and turns of Holly’s life from a scarred adolescence in Gravesend to old age on Ireland’s Atlantic coast as Europe’s oil supply dries up – a life not so far out of the ordinary, yet punctuated by flashes of precognition, visits from people who emerge from thin air and brief lapses in the laws of reality. For Holly Sykes – daughter, sister, mother, guardian – is also an unwitting player in a murderous feud played out in the shadows and margins of our world, and may prove to be its decisive weapon.
Metaphysical thriller, meditation on mortality and chronicle of our self-devouring times, this kaleidoscopic novel crackles with the invention and wit that have made David Mitchell one of the most celebrated writers of his generation. Here is fiction at its most spellbinding and memorable best.

Do love David Mitchell’s writing and, although this one has not enjoyed universal acclaim, the Bone Clocks feels like classic Mitchell. Very much in similar vein to Cloud Atlas with its distinct but interwoven narratives this really does tick along fantastically well.

four stars





House partying

15 03 2014

Crome Yellow by Aldous Huxley

crome

Denis Stone, a naive young poet, is invited to stay at Crome, a country house renowned for its gatherings of ‘bright young things’. His hosts, Henry Wimbush and his exotic wife Priscilla, are joined by a party of colourful guests whose intrigues and opinions ensure Denis’s stay is a memorable one.

Huxley’s debut novel is a satirical flight through a 1920s gathering of bright young things at Crome, home of the Wimbushes. Denis Stone, the innocent young poet, recounts the action and really has very little positive to say about most of his fellow guests. The back story of the previous Crome owners is very entertaining although the line taken by one guest, the improbably named Mr Barbecue-Smith, on higher education is unfortunate: “illuminating, but provoking the Lower Classes to discontent and revolution”

stars-3-5





Going postal: Approximation of a playlist §65

15 02 2014

Prole Art Threat

Songs or artists relating to matters postal

Pillar To Post – Aztec Camera
Note to Self – Jake Bugg
Don’t lose the faith – The Dears
Recovery – Frank Turner
Stand And Deliver – Adam & The Ants
The Sign – Ace Of Basepostbox
Paperback writer – The Beatles
Such Great Heights – The Postal Service
Messages – Orchestral Manoeuvres In The Dark
Send In The Clowns – Frank Sinatra
Dear Prudence – The Beatles
Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye – Bananarama
He’s frank (slight return) – The Monochrome Set
Sign Your Name – Terence Trent D’Arby
Message in a Bottle – The Police
Date stamp – ABC
Please Mr. Postman – The Carpenters
Rudi, A Message To You – The Specials
Signed, Sealed, Delivered, I’m Yours – Stevie Wonder
The Message – Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five
I’ve Gotta Get A Message To You – Bee…

View original post 49 more words





23 12 2012

Reminded today about this book. Am hoping to get for Christmas so I can ignore it again.

Prole Art Threat

How to talk about books you haven’t read by Pierre Bayard

unread

In the spirit intended by the author, I’ve not actually read this book so have to copy the synopsis from Amazon:

Synopsis
In this disarmingly mischievous and provocative book, already a runaway bestseller in France, Pierre Bayard contends that in this age of infinite publication, the truly cultivated person is not the one who has read a book, but the one who understands the book’s place in our culture. Drawing on examples from works by Graham Greene, Umberto Eco, Oscar Wilde, Montaigne (who couldn’t remember books he himself had written), and many others, he examines the many kinds of ‘non-reading’ (forgotten books, unknown books, books discussed by others, books we’ve skimmed briefly) and the many potentially nightmarish situations in which we are called upon to discuss our reading with others (with our loved ones, with the book’s author…

View original post 80 more words





Three at Contemporary

30 07 2010

All three





Hester and Connie

30 07 2010

@Nottingham Contemporary








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